Here is How the TPP Copyright Laws Will Affect the Doujin Community



The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP)’s copyright law has come into effect in Japan, and it’ll change some of the ways people consume doujinshi.

Genshiken

First off, copyright breaches can be prosecuted without a complaint from the original rights holder before legal action is taken. The argument is that allowing third parties to file complaints on the behalf of rights holders will help combat piracy. For Americans, this is similar to how Youtube handles complaints.

Copyright duration has also been extended from 50 to 70 years, bringing Japan inline with most of the world. The extension isn’t just limited to video but includes music and prose. However, works that are currently in the public domain won’t be retroactively copywritten.

So, how will this affect Japan’s rich doujinshi industry? Negima creator Ken Akamatsu took to Twitter to reveal that most doujin creators don’t have much to worry about.

The doujinshi at Comiket are exempt due to a compromise worked out between the government and the convention. For doujin creators to be charged, the rights holder will still need to file a complaint first. So you can keep doing what you do. (But if the rights holder says it’s not okay, then it’s not okay.)

Basically, nothing has changed involving Comiket. The convention, which is hosted twice a year, celebrates the doujinshi community and allows fans to share derivative works of their favorite franchises. Like in the past, every series is fair game unless rights holders have explicitly ask for a ban. One example is Kuroko no Basket works aren’t allowed.

Akamatsu did share a caveat — doujinshi retail stores like Toranoana and Melonbooks may have to shrink their stock.

It’s okay to distribute doujinshi at Comiket, but they can’t be sold at doujinshi stores. Rights holders can tolerate fan activity as long as it’s restricted to a few days (i.e. Comiket), but they believe unrestricted sales through stores is a cause for bother. You must follow those guidelines. (In fact, the doujin mark follows this format, too.)

Basically, manga creators and their publishers are cool with doujinshi as long as you aren’t making bank off of their work. The doujin mark that Akamatsu is referring to is a logo found in manga stating that a creator is fine with derivative fan works as long as it’s not being sold online, sold in dedicated stores, and is not using traced work.

Foreign tourists may have a harder time finding doujinshi when they visit Japan as stores in Akihabara pull stock, but conventions will be safe — for now.

http://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js


What's Your Reaction?

Cute
0
Cute
Fail
0
Fail
Geeky
0
Geeky
Lol
0
Lol
Love
0
Love
OMG
0
OMG
Win
0
Win
Wtf
0
Wtf
Yaaas
0
Yaaas

Comments 0

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

log in

Captcha!

reset password

Back to
log in
Choose A Format
Gif
GIF format